Tips for a noob painter


General questions & discussion involving all things painting, modeling & photography. 

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Post Tue May 16, 2017 2:56 pm

Re: Tips for a noob painter

ramshackle_curtis wrote: As James Holloway says "bases and faces".
He stole that ... Dave Andrews said that. :D
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Post Tue May 16, 2017 3:30 pm

Re: Tips for a noob painter

Harry wrote:
ramshackle_curtis wrote: As James Holloway says "bases and faces".
He stole that ... Dave Andrews said that. :D


A lot of people have said that through the years... all of them right. The human brain is trained to read faces first in order to identify individuals and emotions. That means that even looking at miniatures, even non-human miniatures, the eye is drawn to the face first. The base acts as your background and frame, ask any professional artist about the importance of framing correctly.

LilBroGrendel wrote:Whenever I apply paint to a miniature, I continually clean the brush - not just whenever I am done with one color, but every time I have applied maybe five brush strokes or so.


This too. I like to dip my brush in tea... deliberately! The warmer water seems to help the paint flow and I like to think that the tea gives a warming, sepia tint to my work... those things could both be my imagination though!
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Post Tue May 16, 2017 6:04 pm

Re: Tips for a noob painter

Two questions, is the tea "tea" tea or is it "herbal" tea?

Also, does this mean you have a spare cup of tea at your side when painting (here's one for the pot) or do you use the same cuppa that you're drinking?
Last edited by Snickit on Tue May 16, 2017 8:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Post Tue May 16, 2017 8:09 pm

Re: Tips for a noob painter

Fimm McCool wrote:... I like to dip my brush in tea... deliberately! The warmer water seems to help the paint flow and I like to think that the tea gives a warming, sepia tint to my work... those things could both be my imagination though!


Have you tried other substances? Like Rum or wine (mulled if you like it hot, which some do)? Beer or milk? There could be a whole range of effect to be achieved. Rum for pirate figures, milk for rotting zombies.
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Post Wed May 17, 2017 9:18 am

Re: Tips for a noob painter

Snickit wrote:Two questions, is the tea "tea" tea or is it "herbal" tea?

Also, does this mean you have a spare cup of tea at your side when painting (here's one for the pot) or do you use the same cuppa that you're drinking?


The tea is definitely tea- usually Lapsang Souchong at that time of the evening. I don't consider anything herbal to be 'tea', merely an infusion.
It's the same cup I'm drinking, although because I like my tea superheated I've usually finished drinking it before it gets used as paint water.

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Post Wed May 17, 2017 1:44 pm

Re: Tips for a noob painter

Sounds like a one way street to lead poisoning.

Be careful out there!
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Post Wed May 17, 2017 3:56 pm

Re: Tips for a noob painter

Not if the figure's properly undercoated. I lick my brushes too. :P

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Post Sun May 28, 2017 5:54 pm

Re: Tips for a noob painter

One thing I'd say is to think carefully about the order in which you paint different parts of the model. There are different ideas on this, but I've always found it best to paint from in to out (i.e. skin, inner layers of clothing, outer layers of clothing and then any accessories) that way you tend to have to worry less about getting paint where you don't want it because you are reaching into awkward parts of the model past bits you've already painted. The one exception to this is that it's almost always best to paint areas that you intend to drybrush first as this tends to be messy no matter how careful you are, so best to get it done initially.
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